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Damian Green is also alleged to have “fleetingly” touched a female journalist’s knee, and his details – somehow – found their way onto infidelity website Ashley Madison.

Damian Green thought he could brazen out the allegations about pornography on his office computer by making a counter-accusation about the source of the claim. He thought wrong.

At first, he said the story was “completely untrue and comes from a tainted and untrustworthy source”.

But then former Metropolitan Police Commissioner Sir Paul Stephenson confirmed that he had been informed that pornographic material had been seized from a computer in Mr Green’s office at the time it was raided in 2008.

So Mr Green changed his story to concede that porn had been found on a computer. But he denied downloading it or viewing it. Here’s a summary:

Why should we believe him? He lied about the existence of this material on his office machine and only admitted it because an unimpeachable source called him out on the falsehood. It is unrealistic to believe that he was not told about its existence immediately after the raid on his office.

And what about the nature of the material? We know it didn’t contain children, but we are told it did contain images that would have merited a criminal prosecution if they had been discovered eight weeks later, when the Crime and Immigration Act came into force in January 2009.

That indicates that the material may have included “acts which threaten a person’s life, acts which result in, or are likely to result in, serious injury to a person’s anus, breasts or genitals, bestiality, or necrophilia”.

Looking at that list, it is no wonder that Mr Green wanted to deny any knowledge of the existence of this stuff on his office computer.

But the evidence seems to show that it was there.

As the person responsible for the office, and everything in it, Mr Green should accept that he was responsible for the material found on that computer. And any office worker will attest that having porn on an office computer is a sackable offence.

So – again – resignation, or dismissal, are the only reasonable courses of action.

We’re waiting.


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